Day Date survivors?

One of the most popular watch styles is the Day Date and yet it is hardly ever marketed with any great fanfare.  But it’s no accident that many of the very best Makers have Day Dates in their range as they know that to so many people, it is the perfect wrist assistant.

They tell you the Time, the Date and the Day, the three most pertinent and popular functions of the wristwatch.   They also are available at very affordable prices.  There are Solar, Kinetic and Quartz, Manual wind mechanicals of all sorts of shapes and sizes, but for me the old classic mechanical Automatic is still around, is in good supply and still fun to own.  That feeling of cogs and wheels and springs and things – ticking along on your wrist – no electronics, no touch screen, no Bluetooth, no Wi-Fi and no Internet – but self contained and still a true mechanical technical marvel.

It’s really difficult to beat – no battery, no light requirement and with mechanics that can easily with the movement of your wrist, outlast you.  Mind you if you suddenly “snuff” it, your watch, after a decent interval, perhaps out of respect will also stop!  But it only sleeps – waiting till the next live person comes along and suddenly it’s ticking away – recording time as it was made to do – something a bit science fiction about that and maybe even a bit surreal!  In fact if you think about it – you are simply the custodian of the mechanical watch . . . .

Citizen Eco-Drive Day Date watch - 100m Water Resistance too.

Citizen Eco-Drive Day Date watch – 100m Water Resistance too.

Anyway I feature a few different models here – The first is one of the relatively few Solar powered ones around – from Citizen.

It’s good as it too never needs a battery, it shows the Time, the Date and the Day.  Those three can be adjusted very easily using the crown as it has traditional geared analog hands display.  It will however need to see a decent light source sometimes as with any Solar model, but basically it’s a set and forget watch and it’s very affordable.

The next images feature a few of the Day and Date Automatic models I’ve found and these can be from Dress styles to Divers and all have a common feature – very easy to use.  And of course being automatic, they require nothing from you, except for you to wear them.

Tag Heuer Carrera Calibre 5 Auto Day date

Tag Heuer Carrera Calibre 5 Auto Day date

A great feature of the Automatic (and I’ve already mentioned it) is that it doesn’t have a battery,  it doesn’t require a light source and setting Time Zones or Summer Times is so very uncomplicated (so many specialist watches make a real song and dance about it).
Here it’s just a case of, crown out, move hands, crown in – job done.   No instruction booklets or prodigious memory required for what can often be a hugely over-complicated push button sequence.

Maybe this is a more apt description of an ABC watch!  Because it’s as simple as A, B, C!

Tissot DS1 Auto Day Date

Tissot DS1 Auto Day Date

Certina DS1 Auto Day Date

Certina DS1 Auto Day Date

There are other watches of course that can show the Time, Day and Date plus many other functions, but frankly these are often complicated should you wish to use these functions, such as, as I said changing Time Zones.  But that said there are a few today that overcome some of these limitations. Radio Controlled and GPS models can, used correctly, show the correct Time and Zones and the latest models have tried hard to reduce required command functions should changes be required.

Victorinox Officers Day Date Auto

Victorinox Officers Day Date Auto

But for me the mechanical Automatic is still on top in the practicality and no-brainer stakes, so easy to use and will last many lifetimes.

As an Undertaker (watch collector) acquaintance said to me once – “Basically my friend as long as you are ticking, so will your watch and if not – call me or at least leave a note.  Maybe I can do a deal!”

So the basic data provision of Time, Day and Date as an instant view really hasn’t changed much over the years.  It is still one of the true prerequisites for any watch that somehow manages to sell year after year after year, with little change.

And in keeping with this theme, there are of course some modern watches that manage to display the same data and as a default view.  These include digital and ana/digi models and some even manage an easy to remember pushbutton sequence to access more complicated functions.

These models appear in most price ranges, but for me I tend to look at the affordable ones first.

Two of the better affordable models are the Cssio LCW-M180D-1AER

Casio LCW-M180D-1AER Radio Control, Solar, Day and Date view model.

Casio LCW-M180D-1AER Radio Control, Solar, Day and Date view model.

and the Casio Tough Solar Model WVA-470 Wave-Ceptor

Casio WVA-470 Wave Ceptor - default Day date view

Casio WVA-470 Wave Ceptor – default Day date view

– both of which are well specified models offering many functions such as Radio Control, Solar Power, Stopwatch, Alarms etc.

However they both manage to show the Time in analog and the Day and Date in a digital display as the default view, so meeting those three “must have” indications.  The former model is part of Casio’s Lineage series and as close as you’ll get to “get and forget” models today and represent great value and are relatively inexpensive.

Diver Day Date Quartz - simple and effective.

Diver Day Date Quartz – simple and effective.

There are also a few Diver’s watches around featuring the Day and Date window plus Diver capabilities that offer extreme good value for money and well worth a look.

Once again though it is no surprise that today Casio models feature quite prominently especially in the quest for watches that people “want” to wear.  Models that offer the basics properly (so important) and now of course coupled with a higher technological level that hitherto was just not possible.

Take the Casio LCW Lineage series for example – these manage not only to give the wearer the essentials – of Time, Day and Date as the default view, but also “get & forget” features such as Radio Control and Solar Power.  And Casio with these analog and digital hybrids offer in addition highly effective intuitive ease of use.  I also like the fact they have “come of age” in comparison to the older Casio WVA-470 and don’t advertise on the dial the advanced technology within – they are nicely understated and rather refined in my view.

I have the WVA-470 myself and I like it a lot, but the newer LCW-M180 is much more elegant and in fact a real class act (I’m tempted again just writing this!).

So as to the question of Day and Date watches, I have to admit the Casio LCW (my review soon) is probably the successor to the older mechanical Day date Automatics and a worthy one at that. Though that said, don’t write off the Automatics just yet, I have a feeling they will be around for a long time yet.

Who knows they may be the true survivors – and only Time will tell . . . . . . .

Rare Ladies Movado Day Date Calendar

I like this neat and rather rare 1949/50’s Ladies Movado Day and pointer Date calendar complication model I picked up in Auction recently.

Movado 3 letter Day & Date pointer Calendar index model - 15 Jewel - Ladies

Movado 3 letter Day & Date pointer Calendar index model – 15 Jewel – Ladies

Dated around 1950 maybe it has a 15 jewel manual wind Movado signed movement and a very neat layout dial with a three letter Day window @12, a red tipped Date Pointer with calendar perimeter index, with direct pin side calendar adjusters in addition to the main crown.  The very solid looking square case is stainless steel and measures just 12 mm wide with a slightly domed crystal.  The case is stainless steel and the back is a tight snap fit.  The black leather strap is a standard 8mm fit, so easily interchangeable if needed, though this one is virtually new and recently fitted.

Movado Case data

Movado Case data

This watch is in decent condition with few signs of wear at all except for one tiny ding on the back, which actually is of no consequence.  The important thing for me about buying any of these small complication watches is the mechanics.  Do they work?  In this case there is a 3 letter Day wheel and a Date Pointer, both of which require setting – and on this model they do.

Movado direct adjust Day and Date apertures.

Movado direct adjust Day and Date apertures.

The problem with Auctions is that anybody and his dog have access to fiddle with the items (I’ve seen people open watches, get screwdrivers out and start poking inside – I kid you not!) and whilst the Auction House may indicate in their Condition Report that it winds and appears to run, that’s usually about it.

It is very definitely up to you to ensure it and for this model, that the complications work.

This Movado is a manual wind and has two tiny little pin adjusting holes on the left side, positioned at about 7 and 10 on the outside of the case.  These adjust the Day and the Date independently of the Crown which simply alters the hour and minute hands (the time).
As said fortunately they work on my one, though once I’d had a close look inside I found one of the adjusters was bent out of position.  If left in that condition it could mean that inserting a pin could easily slide past the adjuster and stab the movement in it’s vitals!  Not good at all . . .
The adjuster levers in this model are side sprung, to enable them to move and line up with the internal case apertures and the pin holes.  So I re-centered them and set them into the correct position.  Now if you insert a pin to adjust, it will hit the adjuster dead centre and operate the mechanism as it should.

Movado 15 jewel Day & Date pointer Calendar movement

Movado 15 jewel Day & Date pointer Calendar movement

So a word of warning when you meet a model with pin hole adjusters.  Have a real careful look to see and/or feel the adjuster, before stabbing it harder and harder!  Get it wrong and you can easily damage the movement.

NOTEif you check out the image of the movement above you might just make out the adjusters at the bottom of the image (in the shadow – sorry) – on the underside of the M of Movado and the C of Factories. There are 2 levers which move side to side, sprung – but straighten these and they fit nicely into the case apertures and pin holes.

These ones both work as they should, so adjusting the time, Day and Date is easy.  In fact easier than many modern complication efforts – and amazingly it’s all contained in a very small movement within a small 17mm x 12mm case.

Movado Ladies Day & Date Calendar index model. Circa 1950

Movado Ladies Day & Date Calendar index model. Circa 1950

Yet to get hold of my Wife to get a wrist shot, but when I do, I’ll add it here at the end . . . . after this shot of it lying on my office desk.

Note Oh as usual – if you don’t know, if you click on any image you should get an enlargement . . . . .

Lord Elgin articulated – 1947 vintage

My second Auction purchase is this 1947 vintage Lord Elgin model.  A 3 position adjusted 21 jewel Cal. 670 manual wind movement which is fully signed and working beautifully, keeping excellent time.  Not bad for a watch that’s 70 years old.

Lord Elgin 1947/50 21 jewel articulated Gants watch

Lord Elgin 1947/50 21 jewel articulated Gents watch

This model has articulated lugs, a feature I’ve always admired (in fact I have a few modern watches with this) and these are particularly nice.  The dial here is Cognac coloured with black Roman numerals and a subsidiary Seconds dial, with gold hands.  The Swiss Made script I expected at the foot of the dial is hidden and actually covered over by a coloured slick of paint, so I assume this dial has been refinished at some point in it’s life – the paint used maybe to protect the Swiss text.  Whatever, it was very well done and as the dial is really good I’m certainly not about to fiddle around with it.  It is what it is . . . .

Neat articulated lugs, snap fit back in A1 condition.

Neat articulated lugs, snap fit back in A1 condition.

The case is in great condition, 14K Gold Filled and no marks or rubbing at all.  The back is similar and is a very definite snap fit.  The high domed glass is perfect and overall the watch looks great. The strap is an after market leather one which is absolutely fine and obviously new.  I like the upper and lower case decoration, it’s nicely figured and well done and lifts the watch somewhat from the more usual square faced models I’ve seen.lordelginback2

The watch dimensions are 22 mm wide and with the hinged lug design it means the lug to lug is nearly 46 mm, so when on the wrist this watch looks perfect for today.  On the wrist it looks bigger than you would think.

On the wrist looks bigger than it is owing to the extended hinged lug arrangement.

On the wrist looks bigger than it is owing to the extended hinged lug arrangement.

I’ve always liked Lord Elgin and in fact Elgin watches in general as they were very well priced in their day, affordable and great value for money.  And in saying this, it is gratifying to see that you can pick up a model today such as this for under £40 at auction, which when you consider the style and the fact that this watch works well, is accurate, doesn’t need a battery, looks good and has already lasted 70 years or so – it really can’t be bad!

One of the reasons perhaps why I buy vintage watches.  The other is that I like the look of them.  They often have a style and elegance that seems to be missing from the majority of models offered these days AND of course I wear them.  They are not solely confined to a display cabinet or box, because I wear them all in rotation and they all must function.  I mean that’s what they were made for in the first place and never intended as inanimate objects, but real-time recorders of time.
I have in my collection a few models that I suppose are true vintage in that they are pre’ 1900 and I always make a point of wearing them often, despite the fact that shock suppression wasn’t the best if there at all.
Let’s face it, it didn’t stop people wearing them then, so why should it now?  I usually find in these really old models a certain mechanical quality that’s often so good, that a well looked after watch that’s been around maybe 100/150+ years or so hardly diminishes at all – and I like that!

Vintage Longines (1949/50)

Flared lugs, 14k Gold filled and manual wind.  This Longines cuts quite a dash today with it’s black dial and gold numerals.  It has a subsidiary Seconds dial and elegant hour and minute hands and fully signed case, dial and movement.  Note this model has what are termed “fancy” lugs.

10K Gold Filled Longines Dress Gents - 1949/50 vintage.

10K Gold Filled Longines Dress Gents – 1949/50 vintage.

The movement is a Longines good 17-jewel Cal. 10L, a decent workhorse of it’s day and has been around since 1949/50 and is in pretty good condition.

Longines 10L manual movement

Longines 10L manual movement

No bad case marks or crystal scratches to be seen and it keeps very good time with a decent Power Reserve.

Neat brushed gold finish with fancy lugs - classic.

Neat brushed gold finish with fancy lugs – classic.

The nicely brushed gold finish to the back shows the quality and the fancy lugs lifts it a little bit above the usual.  In short an elegant and subtly understated watch, which when worn today looks great, especially if you happen to be at a formal dress function.  An absolute must, sophisticated and smart.

Longines black dial, gold filled case - elegant and neat

Longines black dial, gold filled case – elegant and neat

The strap in this case is an after market affair, is good enough and compliments the watch generally and is a good fit.

Not much more to say other than this was an Auction find and for what it is would appear to possibly be a bit of a bargain find and certainly worth the paltry bid I offered to secure it – OR IT SHOULD BE . . .

Understated elegance even for today's tastes.

Understated elegance even for today’s tastes.

Note the case, dial and movement are each signed Longines.  The watch overall is a nice size at 25mm x 28mm, but looks slightly larger on the wrist as it sits so well.  Note the fancy lugs are fixed and the strap fixing is standard, so very easy to change.

The Positives

This model’s case is what is called Gold Filled – as opposed to the more often seen Gold Plated.

Longines 10K Gold Filled L&K USA made case

Longines 10K Gold Filled L&K USA made case

Gold Filled is much superior to Gold plating, essentially as it is to a Standard.  Which says for example that a 14K GF must contain 5% of Gold by weight, unlike plating which may only have somewhere around 0.05%.  14K = 14/20 Gold Filled ratio.  Also as it is actually the application of one, two or even three layers of Gold, it is viewed as a true alternative to solid Gold.
The layer or layers are then pressure molded to the base metal of the watch, such as brass.  This particular process means that Gold Filled cases can last a lifetime and don’t easily rub off like Gold Plating often does.

So always worth it to check what Gold system has been applied on any vintage watch and with 10K or 14K Gold Filled (GF), you won’t go far wrong.

As to the which actual Longines Model this is, I have to confess I’m unsure, as there were so many over than period.  It looks similar to a “Buchanan” but has Roman numerals and Dot markers and a black face.  The Buchanan model had the dot markers but regular numbers and a white face and the lugs were not fancy as this one.  The watch date is pretty close as the serial number can be reasonable accurate as a guide.

But is there another reason why the model is not that easy to find?

The Negatives –

On closer examination (initially by a Watch Forum colleague after checking my close up photographs) this dial does not appear to be totally original.  It is what’s loosely called a “re-dial”, where perhaps because the original dial was in such poor condition as a result of damp or damage etc. it was at some point in it’s life – repainted.
The heavy black paint covers over the offending imperfection/s, the markers and numerals may be cleaned up or replaced, the hands re-painted or replaced and any printing re-applied.

The problem with any re-dial however is how well it is managed.  And in this particular case – it’s perhaps not that good.

As my colleague informed me – check out the chronometer cross (the main crossed lines of the dial) – these are NOT straight.  The horizontal line does not go through the centre of the IX (9) or the III (3) at the other side.  One is slightly low, the other slightly high.  These would be absolutely straight on the original dial.
Also looking carefully, the subsidiary Seconds dial perimeter is misaligned even within it’s dial depression – it’s low on the right, so this again was carelessly printed.  Also the hands have had some repainting too though this is fairly common on old watches.

So all in all as he says this is a re-dial and not the best, which is a shame as the rest of the watch, case and movement are perfectly right and in decent condition.  So a tale of caution when you are bidding on an Auction but not present at the Auction – REMOTE BUYER – BEWARE!

NoteThe Auction House condition report noted the painted hands and suggestion of a re-dial at some stage of it’s life.  So as always with remote purchases, there is an element of risk in not having a detailed and close up examination.  As always – buyer beware!
Am I happy with my purchase?  Well I have to say yes – I like the watch and OK it’s not perfect, but it works perfectly . . . . and it looks good on the wrist.

Now you see it, now you don’t!

The title says it all really.  One of the troubles with the digital age is that the images of these new watches on screen and on-line are in fact enhanced artistic license images and NOT often the reality.

Ladies Calvin Klein Future Alarm Watch

Ladies Calvin Klein Future Alarm Watch

And this phenomenon isn’t just a Gents prerogative either – it also affects those modern women and ladies who have embraced the larger masculine style of watch today.  You buy the super watch you saw on-line and when you get it, you can’t make out the time.  It has no contrast or the light is shining at it in the wrong direction and so on.

So it’s nice to spot a watch for the Ladies – and the men as it happens, the only difference basically is the color set up from Calvin Klein, that appears to me to maybe overcome the clarity issue.  I say maybe as I too have only seen them on-line, but at least the retailer I spotted shows a video.  So maybe a more accurate representation and possibly worth a look.

The Calvin Klein Future Alarm model as it’s called for ladies has a nice color way and isn’t very large by todays standards, but actually a nice size for anyone with sensible wrists.  It measures 38 mm diameter and is only 9 mm depth, so neat on the wrist, ladies or gent.  The Ladies version has a white rubber strap and rather stylish colored LCD with blue numerals, which appear to have really decent contrast. The watch has two pushers on the right side a Date feature and an Alarm.  It also has a nice smooth case set up with a decent 30m Water Resistance.

It comes with the Calvin Klein 2 yr Warranty and costs around £160, which is reasonably affordable today.  The colour combination I think works for ladies and IF the contrast and legibility is as I would hope, then this is a pretty good buy.

Gents Calvin Klein Future Alarm Watch

Gents Calvin Klein Future Alarm Watch

The Gents model is only different in the colour and is slightly thicker at 10 mm, so it is said, but the same otherwise.
The Gents version also has the usual macho dark dial job, though in this case I might prefer the Ladies one – as I have a feeling the color set up just might be better clarity wise, though would I dare wear it?

Come to think of it – I probably would!  Unisex is Unisex – right?

Oops! My son has just cried out, “You can’t be serious Dad, you can’t!”  “You got to be kidding me – Yikes!”

You see that’s the trouble with this new generation – they have no sense of humour!   😉

Christofle dress watch

One thing I like about Design Houses is when they turn their hand to watches.  Mostly dress watches it has to be said, but these are often great looking pieces, produced not by watch trade people, but by designers of different products and what is their take on a watch to express their particular Company or philosophy.

Christofle Swiss 21 jewel Automatic

Christofle Swiss 21 jewel Automatic

This is a neat and rather stylish model from Christofle of Paris and a particularly handsome piece it is too – well to my mind it is, as I bought it just the other day at auction.  And at a VERY reasonable two digit price.  Now considering this model cost in 1999 approximately £1300 and it’s in perfect condition (box, papers etc) – I’m well pleased.

It is a decent specified model too with a 21 jewel Swiss ETA 2892-2 automatic movement, Sapphire Crystal and (possible) 18ct gold bezel on a rather elegant stainless steel case, plus articulated “fancy” lugs connecting to the Swiss original green colored Lizard leather strap with signed Christofle stainless buckle.

Readability for me is a basic buying principle and I do like the jet black polished color of the hour and minute hands, which gives excellent contrast against the textured inner dial.

The outer track is on a broad gold colored band with black Roman numerals.  The Date aperture is @3 with contrasting black date numbers against white. The sweep second hand is in gold.

Dial lettering features the Christofle logo and Paris and below shows Automatic with Swiss Made at the foot of the dial.

Note the fluted stainless steel case shaping - plus articulated lugs.

Note the fluted stainless steel case shaping – plus articulated lugs.

The stainless steel case is highly polished with a triple molding feature which pairs up with the strap lug ends.  The crown is @3 and part recessed. The Date is a quick set type and of standard ETA 2892-2 configuration.  The watch also manages a decent Water resistance of 30 m (100 ft) with it’s neat 4 screw stainless steel back

It sits very well on the wrist and at just 37 mm diameter and quite thin at 8.5 mm, it looks neat and the dial color combination with the green Lizard strap lends itself very well to the dress occasion.

As watches go it is a good mid range model, though for me I would balk at paying the new price, which reflects the design house premium.  But for the price I paid and as this watch is in perfect, as new, condition, it is a really good buy.  One of the reasons why Designer watches in general can be excellent pre-owned purchases, is that the new designer inflated price disappears in the second hand market.  And unlike previous times, today many of the designer outlets produce some very, very good watches indeed and well worth a look at Auction price.

GPS Golf Bushnell

Decided to upgrade and renew my old Garmin GPS Golf watch as I felt like a change.  Not that there was anything wrong with my old Garmin, but just because I fancied a change and perhaps take advantage of any improvements in technology gained over the last few years.  I didn’t get another Garmin as the replacement models seemed a little expensive for my needs.  I mean I don’t need a swing improvement meter (to check my back swing against my downswing) and all that stuff as I’m playing golf, not standing about wasting time checking my wrist all the time.  A bit like the Professional Golfers these days who spend far, far too much time discussing with their caddies the wind characteristics, or which club to hit (what ever happened to “feel”?), deciding what spin to impart, blah, blah and blah!  Then as a result playing a rather mediocre shot as a result more often than not.

The Bushnell Neo Ion GPS Golf Watch.

The Bushnell Neo Ion GPS Golf Watch.

Basically all I like is the distance I have left to the hole, the distance to the odd hazard between me and the green, so I can lay-up or fly over that bunker or stream and so on.  It’s also a fact that amateur golfers are more often short on approach shots to the green, usually as they tend to over-estimate the distance they hit each club.
The GPS watch solves that as you can measure each shot’s distance and find out just how far you actually do hit each club.  Not surprisingly many golfers who used to boast 270 yards off the tee with the driver, end up with a serious reality check, as the GPS measures their drive at around the 200 yard mark!

Oh yes!

I used to play of a very low handicap myself and my drive here in the UK was around the 260 yards mark, which was pretty good considering the equipment at that time (1960 – 1986), was actually about UK Pro standard.  Today being a very senior golfer with today’s new equipment I can sometimes manage a drive over 220 yards, but mostly around the 200 yards and my new GPS Bushnell Neo Ion watch confirms it as such.

The Bushnell on the wrist, chunky but very comfortable.

The Bushnell on the wrist, chunky but very comfortable.

The watch is not the smallest around though it’s quite an acceptable size at just a shade under 45 mm diameter with a clear good contrast rectangular digital display.  Quite chunky though at 15.5 mm thick it does however sit very well on the wrist owing to the very flexible silicon strap and buckle set up, which incidentally is VERY comfortable.  I got the Charcoal color version with the Orange under/charcoal strap.  The watch is also very light at a fraction under 50 gms, so you hardly know it’s there.  It is VERY easy to use even though it has 5 push buttons to play with.  Lower left is the Menu button which gives you scroll options such as Pedometer, Odometer, Stopwatch,Timer, Alarm,Battery and Settings.  The right hand 3 buttons are upper right – move up, lower – move down and the center button is the Select function button.

Flat back with recessed charge terminals allows easy connector fit for charging.

Flat back with recessed charge terminals allows easy connector fit for charging.

To start a golf round push the upper left and select Play Golf on the display – it will then seek a signal (about 3 minutes or so depending on location) and it finds the courses near you.  Select the one you are on – it will then load the course data and you are good to go.

The Bushnell also has a tricky feature that I find rather useful called Tee time.  You select the day and the time (within 7 days) of your next game.  7 Minutes prior to your Tee Off time, it switches itself to Golf Mode, seeks the signal, sets your course and basically as you step on to the tee, it displays the correct course and the 1st hole yardage is there ready for you.  If it’s a shotgun start competition, the GPS function will track your position on the course, indicate the hole you are on with the data you need.  It works very well and is a really nice feature and far more useful than some swing analysis function that I simply don’t need.

Very flexible silicon strap with orange underside. This is the Charcoal color version.

Very flexible silicon strap with contrasting orange underside. This is the Charcoal color version.

The hazard indication of each hole I suppose could be better served with the symbol idea of the Tom Tom watches, as the Bushnell simply describes the hazards as abbreviations, which whilst you’ll soon get to know them, took me a few guesses to get right the first few times I tried it.  The yardages to and over the hazards is however as accurate as any and very useful, especially as now with your GPS watch you will now how far you hit the ball any of your clubs!  (assuming you DO hit the ball of course!).  Oh yes I forgot to mention you can, with a simple push of a button, measure your shot distance.

Main menu gives scroll options - the right upper and lower buttons control the scroll.

Main menu gives scroll options – the right upper and lower buttons control the scroll.

The watch manages around 3 rounds of golf and if not playing golf/using the GPS function it will act as a watch for around a year which is rather better than most others..  It is easily charged with it’s supplied charge cable (USB ended) and connects to the watch with a clip on back plate, which fits over the back and connects to the terminals on the watch back.

This fitting is not as fiddly as either the Garmin or the Tom Tom and simple to use.  It only takes a few hours and the watch is charged ready to go.
I have to say I’m pretty pleased with it so far, certainly in use and practicality.  Also the price is more affordable in comparison to most of the opposition I’ve seen.  It’s also nicely unobtrusive and understated on the wrist and though hardly noticeable it does the job very well.

So is it a good buy?

Yes – for me it has been – I like it, it works well, I can easily see it and it’s simple and easy to use.

And has my golf improved?  Well that’s more tricky to answer, though I’m now certain my drives are 200 yards not 260 yards and the fact I know how far I hit my new irons is a bit of a revelation – so I’m optimistic that the golf will improve – in fact I’m sure it will and surely that’s got to be good!